Tag Archives: blueberry

fruit salad with basil

fruit salad with basilThe jackets are stowed and the tank tops aplenty.  Give your fruit salad some peps by adding fresh basil. 

To really infuse the flavors, mix all ingredients 30 minutes before serving.  Today I enjoyed a combination of peach, banana, apple, and blueberry.  The banana adds a luscious creaminess and juxtaposition of texture from the firmness of the blueberries and apple.  The peach is a flavor complement to both blueberries and bananas.  Basil ties this together into something curiously savory and herbaceous.

summer salad

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got no time for oats in the morning?

oats 1 minuteThese took 1 minute to look like this and are not quick-cooking oats.

Was there magic involved?  Did I employ a pressure cooker?  The latter I have never even seen in my life, and if I had learned the former I don’t know if I’d be sitting and typing on a lap top right now.

Soaking anything in water and cooking it already makes the ingredient more digestible.  What’s more for these intents and purposes is that the cooking time is reduced by 10; it only takes a minute to cook.  Where’s the magic!  Before you go to sleep, cover 1 part oats and 2 parts water in a container and store it in the fridge.  When you wake up, dump it into a pot, bring it to a boil, and your oats are cooked.  I prefer to dash it with cinnamon, cardamom, a pinch salt, and a drizzle honey for aromatics.

oats with toastIf you dare, serve it up with some toasted Buckwheat Loaf topped with tahini mixed with blueberry preserves for those with nut allergies.  This morning felt fancy.

And what’s the deal with oats, anyways?  Are they gluten-free?  Which are easiest to digest?

1.  Oats are (technically) gluten-free. The oat part of the wheat does not contain gluten.  The reason those with strong gluten intolerances are advised to stay away from oats is that during manufacturing and processing there is cross contamination of the wheat gluten and the oat.  This is one more reason that it’s good to avoid quick-cooking oats in addition to their subpar taste– they have clearly been processed to make them that way.

2. Which oats can I eat, then?  Gluten-free oats are obviously void of gluten, but also priced significantly higher.  If you can find spelt flakes, je suis fan— the spelt grain in the wheat family is found by many who have gluten intolerances easier to digest.  Their flakes follow the same principle.  (<–They are the oats pictured.)  Steel cut oats are the least processed oats on the market, thereby the least likely to contain any gluten.  Avoid quick-cooking oats or anything already packaged with flavoring unless it’s indicated gluten-free, as the flavoring might contain additives that are not terrible to consume.

3.  Can those with Celiac consume oats?  This has been up for debate, and research provides different answers.  According to the Canadian Celiac Association, “consumption of pure, uncontaminated oats is safe in the amount of 50 to 70 grams per day (1/2 – 3/4 cup dry rolled oats) by adults and 20 to 25 grams per day (1/4 cup dry rolled oats) by children with celiac disease.” (Ref: Canadian Celiac Association)

spelt flakes

 

 

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