Tag Archives: lactose

morning inspiration: DIY RAISIN BRAN and spirulina in Haribo!

raisin bran diyHappy things filled my brain this morning.  Firstly, the discovery that was made this weekend is worth mentioning: Haribo has Spirulina in it.  Yes, Haribo — those delightful gummies that are neither too sweet nor too tacky.  Since they are flavored with natural flavors and colors (another woo!), they contain Spirulina, which is a cyanobacterium that contains calcium, protein, antioxidants, vitamins… lots of good stuff.  While eating green gummies will probably not save my life, this was certainly a petite pleasure to discover.

haribo croco

My head was further massaged when I blended things in my pantry.  Not machine blending, but more holding hands, I guess.  Being a “Bubble Child” with a strong nut allergy, gluten intolerance, and corn sensitivity makes finding cereal in France rather challenging.  If it’s not filled with wheat its gluten-free alternative is a flake of corn.  If I can find a healthy looking muesli, it will have hazelnuts.  What’s a girl to do?  Ahhh, DIY.

All I seem to find are buckwheat flakes and puffs of various sorts (rice, buckwheat, etc.)  How about…. I want raisin bran so I combine those two with raisins?  Magique!

flakes and raisins

Here’s your morning inspiration: to save your stomach, histamines, and wallet some work, try combining different cereal flakes you can eat with different dried fruits and dark chocolate chips (!!) to have some custom lovin’ every morning in a bowl.  Top with either lactose-free milk or dairy-free milk of choice, and you’re smooth sailing for the day. <3

Advertisements

1 Comment

Filed under buy me, dairy bubble, explore PARIS, gluten bubble, nut bubble, recipes, smarty pants, vegan

gluten-free teff BAGUETTE

cooked baguetteswhen the goin’ gets teff… (first and last bad joke, I promise)

brushing oil teff breadoh baby

teff milkTeff flour has been one of my favorite substitutes for wheat flour for a while now.  Teff milk was a new discovery today: I’m not sure that rice milk is the best thing to consume out of the lactose-free milks as it’s basically just sugar.  It’s not bad, but it’s not rich, either.  Teff milk has now been my favorite dairy-free milk for one day.  A whole day.  And now night.

It’s real here: baguette is something that surpasses stereotype.  It surrounds the daily function of the Parisian, clings to the backs of those dedicated enough to leave an opening in their backpacks for the long strand of yeast-risen staple, breaks beneath the fingers of the eager who cannot make it home without finding the tip missing.  Yup, baguette’s a thing.  And today I wanted one real bad.  That’s when I found teff flour for the first time in grocery stores here.  Sha buy yah roll call

teff bread demi baguetteI think you’ve gotta be a bit of a geek to make it in this world.  Tech-y stuff is all over, and what’s slightly paradoxical is that I’ve found the more I give up my old ways of traditional-is-better-because-it’s-more-human, unless I actually want to go Neanderthal, it’s hit me that these new advances in images and sound and things with computers and wires can actually make the human things we do more interesting.

shaping baguetteIt’s not like the computer made the baguette.

I say this because you may notice that these pictures look slightly better than the past.  That’s because technically they are.  I’ve succumbed to, with the greatest pleasure, an actual camera.  It’s manual, I control things like aperture and shutter speed, and photoshop is now something taking up space in my hard drive.  In between washing off the teff flour and gluten-free yeast from my hands,  I spent my first day with my new ally in the kitchen.  And then ate some baguette so I’d have something pretty to share with you.  Of course, that was the only impetus to construct a plate like this.

plated breadExcuses are lovely sometimes.

Teff Baguette

-vegan-

-gluten, nut, soy, dairy, egg, and corn free-

ingredients: 2 tbs (21 g) flax seeds, 3 tbs (41 g) hot water, 1/4 cup (50 g) + 1/3 cup (75 g) teff milk [can substitute water], 3/4 cup (90g) teff flour, 3/4 cup (100 g) brown rice flour, 2 tbs (16 g) arrowroot starch/flour, 8 g yeast, 1/4 tsp (a large pinch) sea salt, 2 teaspoons honey or agave nectar

method: In small bowl, pour hot water over flax seeds.  Let soak 20 minutes.  Combine flax seed mixture with 1/4 cup teff milk (or alternative dairy-free milk or water) until puréed.  Set aside.

flax seed mixCombine all dry ingredients in large bowl, adding salt at the very last second before you add liquid.  (Salt will kill the yeast if left too long without the sugar to feed on.)

dry ingredientsAdd flax seed mixture and half of the teff milk.  Knead with hands.  Add honey/agave nectar and remainder of milk and more if needed to get a moist dough that is not sticky.  If too dry, add more milk or a bit water.  If sticky, add a bit of rice flour.  Knead for about 5 minutes, form into a ball, and let rise in bowl covered with wet towel.

kneading doughcovered rising doughKnead again for 5 minutes, separate into three balls for mini baguettes, two balls for demi baguettes, or keep whole for a large baguette.  Roll into a cylinder, then taper out the edges.  Place on a prepared baking sheet (silicon mat and a light oiling will do quite well) and flatten a bit in the middle, and then fold in both edges (see photo at beginning of post).  You’ll make a bit of a smushed taco.  Flip over (the smush is the bottom of the baguette) and make lines with a small knife on the top.  Cover with a damp towel and let rise about 1 1/2-2 hours minimum.*  Pre-heat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C).  Bake bread for 5 minutes.  Remove from oven and brush with a fine layer of oil and sprinkle with salt.  Place back in oven turned the other way, for even cooking, and bake another 10 minutes.  If the inside or bottom is not cooked through, reduce heat to 375 F (185 degrees C) and bake for another 5-10 minutes.  This really varies upon the size of your baguette and your oven.  Remove from heat, let cool to touch, and consume within a day for freshness.  To keep longer, keep it in the freezer until use.

*If preparing the night before, keep covered in the refrigerator and let rise in a warm place for 1 1/2 hours the next day.

1 Comment

Filed under buy me, dairy bubble, explore PARIS, gluten bubble, nut bubble, recipes, vegan

Inspiration: MIDNIGHT BAGUETTE and Noglu

baked buckwheat baguette

I have to say that as long as I make the baked good from scratch, I have very little guilt about eating it.  Even if it is a baguette at midnight.

I was inspired today after stopping in at Noglu, a 100% gluten-free restaurant in Paris with everything from burgers to pastries.  It’s no surprise they are expanding to a new takeaway location– they produce some killer looking gluten-free goodies.

Anyways, a simple shout-out to Noglu Paris and a thank you for inspiring me to make a gluten-free baguette ce soir.  The Bubble Child cookbook will be released soon, so keep your eyes out for it to get my bread recipes. : )

before baking baguetteMr. Mojo’s risin’

 

1 Comment

Filed under Bubble Child The Cookbook, buy me, explore PARIS, gluten bubble, nut bubble, recipes, smarty pants, vegan

Avocado Banana Bread

avocado banana breadthe $5 plating

fancy plating avocado banana breadthe $12 plating (No, I have not left my apartment for 2 days.  Gremlin flu.)

I still remember the day after homecoming.  Senior year, me working in a scrapbook shop, me being sent home.  Nay, not a sending home because of frivolous amounts of partying the night before (the angel I was didn’t really drink in high school), but because I almost fainted from being sick.  I thought it was strep throat. Which I guess can easily be construed for mono.

Homecoming 2005Me and pops von Trapp, homecoming ceremony 2005 ‘merica!

I can’t compare what I have right now to mono, aside from the throat that won’t sit still, the ample plugging and then releasing of the nasal region, and the impressive head pressure.  Also the fact that I am horrible at being sick.  I really am:

The week of homecoming my extracurricular jargon kept me at an average of 5 hours of sleep a night (I was notably sick then, too).  Once discovering it was mono and being quarantined to protect my peers,  I gained weight instead of lose it because if I’m stuck at home, what better way to pass the time than the prepare food?  Nothing has changed.  This octopus flu has me cooped up like an unwilling chicken and I am unexpectedly active in the hen house.

Guess the not being able to sit still thing is good for the career of Chef. And here’s an experiment gone right in my days of sunny cabin fever.

blender

Avocado Banana Bread

Gluten, nut, dairy, soy, and corn-free.  Vegan option.

1 avocado

2 bananas

1/4 cup honey (or agave nectar for vegan)

1 tsp. pure vanilla extract

1/4 tsp. sea salt

3/4 cup buckwheat flour

1/4 cup + 2 tbs. potato starch

1/2 tsp. baking powder

Preparation time: 5 minutes

Cooking time: about 15-20 minutes

Serves 4-6

1. Pre-heat oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit (160 degrees Celcius).  Slice avocado and banana into small pieces.  Purée these pieces in blender with honey (or agave), vanilla, and sea salt.

2. Combine dry ingredients in separate bowl.  Combine with wet ingredients until batter is formed.  Bake for 15-20 minutes in standard ovens (or until inserted toothpick comes out clean).

It’s a healthy cake.  Still tasty, but gotta say it.  To make it slightly less healthy, cover it with frosting.  (I whipped some kefir with powdered sugar for an icing.)

avocado and banana

 

Leave a comment

Filed under dairy bubble, gluten bubble, nut bubble, recipes, vegan

No Oven Gluten-Free Bread

steamed buckwheat loafToday was an odd day in technology for me, in turn spawning some very odd human behavior.  First of all, you may notice that these photos are less than subpar quality.  That is because for some reason my camera decided to eat the “lock” switch on my memory card, guarding the camera decidedly in “memory card locked” mode like an unfair coma.  Given that I spend all of my money on food, I have not updated my cellular device for several many years, and this is what is providing the images today.

RIP OvenFurthermore, my oven died.  It’s really not a huge shame, as you can see from the picture on the right, it was a bit abysmal to begin with.  I suppose churning out breads and desserts and braising meats for hours on end is not what this little guy was originally designed for.  Boo hoo.  This all happened, however, after I had prepared the dough for my favorite Buckwheat Herb Loaf and it had already risen to well over two times its original volume.  I really wanted a sandwich today.  This just wouldn’t do.

Thus, I started thinking how I could possibly make this uncooked loaf a slab of bread.  Only one thing came to mind: steam it like a vegetable.  The world is strange, and this is stranger: it tasted better than when I cooked it in the oven.  Steaming it provided a perfectly even cooking and guarded the moisture inside the bread without having it remotely undercooked.  Its air bubbles stood up taller.  It’s even more spongey.  Whaaaat a weird way to finally get my sandwich.  I had to torch my lactose-free cheese with a creme bruler burner to have it melt.  Alright.

torching cheesenot like pudding

sandwich at lastvictory, you’re so sweet

Anyways, this necessitated the use of my unintelligent smart phone to share this knowledge with you.

Steamed Bread: (!)

1. Take your favorite gluten-free bread recipe (try Home Sweet Honey Buns or Herb Buckwheat Loaf from this site) and put it in a greased and floured mold that will fit into a large pot with a vegetable steaming basket underneath (see photo at right.)  Prepare recipe and let rise indicated time.

2. Boil enough water that it won’t evaporate during 20 minutes cooking but will not overflow into the bread.  Bring to a boil, then put your loaf in the steaming device.  Cover the pot, let cook for 15-20 minutes over medium heat, replacing water if dry.  You will be able to tell it’s cooked through because the top will be solid and when you tap the crust of the dough it will feel solid throughout, as well.

3. Remove from steamer, let cool about 5 minutes before running a knife around the edges to loosen from mold.  Feel free to toast it afterward if you have a functioning oven.

steaming bread

Leave a comment

Filed under Bubble Child The Cookbook, buy me, dairy bubble, gluten bubble, nut bubble, recipes, smarty pants, vegan